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What Ever Happened to Black Power? (And Do We Care?)

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  • What Ever Happened to Black Power? (And Do We Care?)

    My Nubian family ABIBIFAHODIE! I was asked by a Brother on this site does black power mean anything anymore? This was a good question because what we see today is our people not putting enough effort in organization and mobilization in our communities this is because we suffer from psychological mental slavery. With mental slavery we have a lot of ego which brings about selfishness. If we form groups we have to learn to bring our resources together in our communities for the better. This means a strong social structure economic structure as well. Even online we should be supporting I own websites as well if we don't challenge the true sickness which is psychological and mental slavery we will never be able to bring about a strong organized structure the battle starts with the individual before we can deal with the collective.

    Respect and Peace.

    please take the time and read this article and give your comment.
    A new Malcolm X biography has put black nationalism in the news again. Reniqua Allen looks back, and forward, at the political ideology he helped popularize.

    • Art Jay II
      #1
      Art Jay II commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree with you brother Tariq for sure. But I also think there are other obstacles as well that we all have to deal with that hinders our ability or desire to organize or patronize businesses. This obstacles include:

      Money- The rat race is real and commands our time and attention. Many of us work for the Wazungu who find as many ways as possible to keep our focus on his business with as little benefits provided to employees as possible. Many folks work two jobs just to survive.

      Time- our time is precious and little. Folks aren't able to raise their children properly because their time and attention is focused on Wazungu business (a job).

      Inflexible Business practices- There are many challenges that divides black customers and black business:
      Inflexibility- In my experience it seems that the black customer and black business are inflexible to one another's issues, concerns, and needs. A customer might need prices to be more competitive to meet budgetary needs. The business might need the customer to give opinions on the goods and service to improve. Neither tend to be willing to meet each other halfway. This helps no one and kills black business relationships.

      Impatience: to understand the needs of one another one must have patience and listen without preconcived notions about ones intentions. Black customers tend to want what they when they want it. Black businesses tend to be inequiped to handle finicky customers and in some ways loath or dismiss their needs. Many black businesses are in start up phase and are unable to provide the level of goods or service that customers expect. Black customers tend to lack the patience with black businesses to improve and grow their business. Usually black customers don't have the time to wait on products for they have little time for even themselves/ their families

      Distrust- As you suggest, our psychological slavery hinders us from trusting one another as businesses and customers. Our current culture ,that is in many ways a result of internalized oppression, teaches us not to ever trust one another and to always try and get as much as we can from the customer/business with little compensation provided to the customer or business. I've witnessed this many times from the businesses my wife and I conduct.

      The conclusion is that we have to foster a culture of mutual respect, patience, flexibility, and understanding on BOTH sides of the business spectrum. This comes from communication- listening expressing and understanding the issues. We have to invest in one another as businesses and customers. Sometimes I am willing to pay the higher price if it seems like the best that business can do until they are able to be more competitive. If black businesses' target market deals with cost then they should pass down the cost savings to the customer if they get cheaper distribution to maintain the business relationship.
      We cannot afford to do business like the Wazungu. We cannot think like them concerning one another. We have to constantly check ourselves- our internalized oppression-our mental slavery at all times.
      Last edited by Art Jay II; 04-01-2018, 12:58 PM. Reason: I'm not finished

    • Art Jay II
      #2
      Art Jay II commented
      Editing a comment
      Another aspect of your question involves the term black power. I consider that black folks do not collectively understand black power. We have to define and express/ embody the definition in our everyday activities. It has to be apart of our goals and aspirations. Not just chasing the dollar but chasing black power. Dwa Ntr
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