Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
 

Solutions to build a black community

Solutions to build a Black Community!







...
 

African Spirituality

“African spirituality” emerging as a new pseudo denomination ultimately an extension of Eurocentric exoticifcation of Africa. We see the loose generalization...
 

Africa’s History did not start with Slavery

It takes more than a horrifying transatlantic voyage chained in the filthy hold of a slave ship to erase someone’s culture–Maya Angelou

...
 

Revolution of Consciousness

Spiritual Connection: Know Thyself!










...

First Woman and Man: "Mother-Right"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • First Woman and Man: "Mother-Right"

    First Woman and Man: "Mother-Right"

    The concept of a family with a father, mother, and child (or patriarchy), is unfortunately not a true picture of the original family. The first type of family was matriarchal since the role of the father in procreation was unknown. Even today, among tribes in Central Australia and the Trobriand Islands, we find people possessing no knowledge of the nature of pa
    ternity. In such a society, even if the father lives with the mother, he is not considered the head of the family.

    Available evidence concludes that the earliest human groups or families consisted not of father, mother, and their descendants, but of mother and her descendants in the female line, since no other line of descent was recognized at that time. The system of female descent was known as "Mother-Right."

    The role of gender in the evolution of man is very important. Most of all of the existing evidence opposes the theory of male superiority. In nearly all animal species, the female is the superior and dominant type. Even in the human race, before the rise of civilization, female rule was practically universal. Prior to the vertebrate level, the male sex is relatively unimportant.

    In primitive society humans lived in groups or clans each of which was based on common descent in the female line, and the members were joined together for mutual protection, and marriage within the group was forbidden. Members of one group would have to pick a mate from another group. This type of matrimony is known as exogamy, this promiscuity was an evolution that led successively to group-marriage, loose monogamy, and finally the patriarchal family of today.

    In primitive society, exogamy is closely connected with another system called totemism. Totems of kindred groups were first formed for food supply purposes. A plentiful food supply and improved tools permitted people to settle permanently in villages. Land ownership became a part of a cooperative family venture, after which is when the structure began to change from matriarchal (mother) to patriarchal (father), or the "Father-Right" family of today.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Tariq View Post
    First Woman and Man: "Mother-Right"

    The concept of a family with a father, mother, and child (or patriarchy), is unfortunately not a true picture of the original family. The first type of family was matriarchal since the role of the father in procreation was unknown. Even today, among tribes in Central Australia and the Trobriand Islands, we find people possessing no knowledge of the nature of pa
    ternity. In such a society, even if the father lives with the mother, he is not considered the head of the family.

    Available evidence concludes that the earliest human groups or families consisted not of father, mother, and their descendants, but of mother and her descendants in the female line, since no other line of descent was recognized at that time. The system of female descent was known as "Mother-Right."

    The role of gender in the evolution of man is very important. Most of all of the existing evidence opposes the theory of male superiority. In nearly all animal species, the female is the superior and dominant type. Even in the human race, before the rise of civilization, female rule was practically universal. Prior to the vertebrate level, the male sex is relatively unimportant.

    In primitive society humans lived in groups or clans each of which was based on common descent in the female line, and the members were joined together for mutual protection, and marriage within the group was forbidden. Members of one group would have to pick a mate from another group. This type of matrimony is known as exogamy, this promiscuity was an evolution that led successively to group-marriage, loose monogamy, and finally the patriarchal family of today.

    In primitive society, exogamy is closely connected with another system called totemism. Totems of kindred groups were first formed for food supply purposes. A plentiful food supply and improved tools permitted people to settle permanently in villages. Land ownership became a part of a cooperative family venture, after which is when the structure began to change from matriarchal (mother) to patriarchal (father), or the "Father-Right" family of today.
    Makes sense women are the nurturer of life. Men are the protector of that. Everything is upside down from the way things were intended to be. We have to much gender competition when there is no need for that. Add in same sex agenda and you add more divisions.

    Comment


    • #3
      • Makes sense women are the nurturer of life. Men are the protector of that. Everything is upside down from the way things were intended to be. We have to much gender competition when there is no need for that. Add in same sex agenda and you add more divisions.






      Indeed My Brother.

      Comment


      • #4
        I can innerstand the intent behind this post as far as ideas from afrikan cultures but no one afrikan cultural expression speaks to the many cultural expressions in the continent. Balance was at the core of western Afrikan cultures and as far as we know about ancient Kmt, man and women were created simultaneously.

        Comment


        • #5
          Its interesting that I came across this thread today. I'm currently reading a book called Reinventing Africa by Ifi Amadiume where she address this same topic. Particularly interesting is the info she provides, using several sources but mainly the work of Chiekh Anta Diop, showing how this view of Mother-Right led to the development of African societies (culture) and religions and other practices that, at their core, reflected this understanding. She shows how, in more recent history in the early years of European colonization of Africa, the well organized and autonomous women's organizations (developed from the matriarchal basis of the various cultures from ancient times onward) were able to mount spontaneous and effective opposition to injustices against African men and women and the threat to the general power base of all women in the society (regardless of socio-economic background etc) that patriarchy presented.
          In her work, she highlights a few African groups (Nnobi in Nigeria, Merina in Madagascar, Tellensi in Mali (I think), and one other that escapes me now).

          In it she says:

          "There are two unique and specific contributions that African women have made to world history and civilization. The first is matriarchy as a fundamental social and ideological base on which African kinship and wider social and moral systems rest. The second is directly related to this matriarchal factor. This is the dual-sex character of African political systems, a characteristic uniquely African."


          About the Nnobi in particular she says:

          "The minutetest productive unit was the matri-centric unit - the mkpuke structure, a distinct mother-focused social category which occupied a distinct space in the form of a self-contained compound of mother and children. It had an economic base, since it produced for itself; it was a production and consumption unit of those who ate from one pot or one plate. This unit also had an ideological base as it was bound in the spirit of common motherhood, in the ideology of umunne, with its strong moral and spiritual force binding members in , care, compassion, peace and respect, and forbidding incest and bloodshed."




          Give thanks to you brother Tariq for bringing this topic up for information and discussion. Worthy of our study and focus at this time.

          Comment

          Working...
          X