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Marcus Garvey Pan-African development

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  • Marcus Garvey Pan-African development

    There is a disconnected generation, since Garvey and the Nation of Islam, that has played completely into the hands of their own oppression by ignoring economics. The myth that poverty is piety in revolution has lead to a revolution lost to its own liberation mechanism; impractical and destined to fail. Revolution is a privilege for the well fed, who can focus their concerns beyond a hand-to-mouth existence, who can resist trinkets, and stay true to the mission beyond temptation. Financial success also means having the disposable income to commit to great public projects, which embed and enshrine liberation values. How then is the myth of a pauper revolutionary a legitimate methodology of revolution? How is it revolution when it tightens the shackles of slavery? How can it ever be a more authentic experience of struggle, when it fails to grasp the objectives of struggle--end of poverty (culturally, spiritually, and materially) .~ AHSMarcus

    Garvey directed the largest mass-based movement among African Americans in the history of the United States.

    His phenomenal success came at a time when African American confidence was low and unemployment was considered a way of life. Garvey harnessed these conditions to build momentum for his cause.While his worldwide accomplishments and controversies have been analyzed by numerous scholars (Rogoff and Trinkaus, 1998), this paper investigates the economic thoughts of Marcus Garvey. Specifically, it visits Garvey's capitalistic approach to the economic development of African Americans in the United States. It was suggested by W.E.B. DuBois (1940) that Garvey's business ventures failed because of incompetence and economic ineptitude. However, Marcus Garvey's plan for African American capitalism was an enormous contribution because his ill-fated business enterprises became the procedural and conceptual model for future achievements in African American economic development.



  • #2
    Quotes by the Honourable Marcus Mosiah Garvey


    "You can only make the best out of life by knowing and understanding it. To know, you must fall back on the intelligence of others who came before you and have left their records behind.


    *There is nothing in the world that you want that you cannot have so long as it is possible in nature and men have achieved it before. The greatest men and women in the world burn the midnight lamp. That is to say, when their neighbours and household are gone to bed, they are reading, studying and thinking.


    *One must never stop reading. Read everything that you can that is of standard knowledge. Don't waste time reading trashy literature... The idea is that personal experience is not enough for a human to get all the useful knowledge of life, because the individual life is too short, so we must feed on the experience of others.


    *Read history incessantly until you master it. This means your own national history, the history of the world---social history, industrial history, and the history of the different sciences; but primarily the history of man. If you do not know what went on before you came here and what is happening at the time you live, but away from you, you will not know the world and will be ignorant of the world and mankind.


    *Anything that you are going to challenge, you must first know about it, so as to be able to defeat it. The moment you are ignorant about anything the person who has the intelligence of that thing will defeat you. Therefore, get knowledge, get it quickly, get it studiously, but get it anyway."

    Ashe

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