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The Black Woman Holds The Key

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  • The Black Woman Holds The Key


  • #2
    This is a very powerful video. I enjoyed watching this and will try to send the video link to other sisters as well. I personally think one of his most important points (although I think the entire video was done well) is when he discussed the defeminization of the Afrikan woman. You see this everywhere… In music videos, Afrikan women aren't women we're just body parts.

    On commercials like Pepsi's Superbowl ad, apparently we're overly aggressive and abusive. (In the Pepsi commercial case, not only did they defeminize the Afrikan woman, they effeminized the Afrikan man.) And in order for Afrikan women to make it in corporate society, she has to be able to “deal” with her male counterparts, and many women are often wrongly led to believe that they must act overly aggressive and masculine, give up their feminine qualities, and even abandon the idea of starting and maintaining a family in order to maintain a career . The Afrikan woman taking on this aggressive role is not seen as much of a threat as the Afrikan man being strong, intelligent, and conscious. In fact, Afrikan women taking on an aggressive role, is not only laughed at, it’s even promoted; and is usually thrown back in our faces (Sapphire stereotype).

    It’s extremely important for Afrikan women to realize our important role, our rich history, and to recognize and embrace the fact that we indeed hold the key. Once we realize and embrace this, we can then get our families and communities back. Until then, we are still zombies walking in darkness.

    Sister Dayah, do you know if there were any videos done on the effeminization of the Afrikan man? I’m interested in seeing that as well.

    Great post, my sister!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Saartje View Post
      T
      his is a very powerful
      video. I enjoyed watching this and will try to send the video link to other sisters as well. I personally think one of his most important points (although I think the entire video was done well) is when he discussed the defeminization of the Afrikan woman. You see this everywhere… In music videos, Afrikan women aren't women we're just body parts.

      On commercials like Pepsi's Superbowl ad, apparently we're overly aggressive and abusive. (In the Pepsi commercial case, not only did they defeminize the Afrikan woman, they effeminized the Afrikan man.) And in order for Afrikan women to make it in corporate society, she has to be able to “deal” with her male counterparts, and many women are often wrongly led to believe that they must act overly aggressive and masculine, give up their feminine qualities, and even abandon the idea of starting and maintaining a family in order to maintain a career . The Afrikan woman taking on this aggressive role is not seen as much of a threat as the Afrikan man being strong, intelligent, and conscious. In fact, Afrikan women taking on an aggressive role, is not only laughed at, it’s even promoted; and is usually thrown back in our faces (Sapphire stereotype).

      This was an excellent post and deserves some comment in consciousness of our reality. (Point 1.) Everything we've been taught about womanhood and manhood must be challenged. Obviously Afrakan women as with our men, are not one dimensional but multi-dimensional in our character and make-up. The idea of a woman exhibiting assertive or aggressive traits is cultural and goes back beyond recorded history. The idea of a woman being this way or that way is generally based upon some "man's perspective" since man is generally the one writing history...men are usually the ones who are the fashion designers of women's wear...are usually the designers of women's hair...of women's shoes and of women's rights in the Eurocentric world which many have mistakenly accepted as the standard due to their conditioning and ignorance. (lack of knowledge)

      The Afrakan woman is the biggest threat that the planet has. When her head is right, the world will have a problem. Why so?...because it is she who actually governs the home, affects the children the greatest and is the most feared in the world. When Christianity started, the first thing that had to be done was to destroy the female principle of Our Creator in order to advance an exclusively male principle of Our Creator. During slavery, the concentration was on the Afrakan woman as is evidenced by the Willie Lynch Papers in The Making of a Slave. It was the image of the Afrakan woman that the world was bowing down to and even the Pope today prays before the Black Madonna and Child. The issue is not with the assertiveness or aggressiveness of the Afrakan woman, it's the idea that her assertiveness or aggressiveness doesn't cover all areas. If she was culturally and mentally and as spiritually assertive or aggressive as she is capable of being vocally or emotionally or physically, the entire world would change....beginning with her man and her children.

      It’s extremely important for Afrikan women to realize our important role, our rich history, and to recognize and embrace the fact that we indeed hold the key. Once we realize and embrace this, we can then get our families and communities back. Until then, we are still zombies walking in darkness.

      Sister Dayah, do you know if there were any videos done on the effeminization of the Afrikan man? I’m interested in seeing that as well.

      Great post, my sister!
      The effeminization of the black man is rarely spoken about but needs to be addressed. Since we are dealing with a people who are largely homosexuals, incestuous, cannibalistic and destructive in their physical nature, and who wrote in their own history books that "they considered it a sign of weakness for a man to a woman"...there is a whole chapter of our peoples experience during slavery missing. No one speaks about the amount of rape that young black boys were subjected to by homosexual white males. There was a process called "Buck Breaking" that they used to do to the strongest or most masculine black man on the plantation. They would literally strip him naked and tie him between four horses. Then they would call all the enslaved black people out to watch as a white man would sodomize him in front of all the people as a means of stripping him of his respect and manhood on that plantation...or as a means of sending home the message that "the only man on that plantation is him, the white man."

      Again, Great Post !!


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